Podcast: Emma Beddington At The Books That Built Me

 

Emma Beddington, credit Natalie Hill [165332]
Emma Beddington, photographed by Emma Hills
If you like Emma’s blog, Belgian Waffle, you will fall completely in love with her when she talks about the books she loves – discover why Babar was a banned book in her house and why it was Simone De Beauvoir as much as French ELLE that inspired her passion for Paris and all things French.

The podcast of Emma Beddington’s Books That Built Me is now on iTunes and it’s also available on Soundcloud (see below).

“I always want things to be at least slightly funny, even if they are really, really sad”. An interview with Emma Beddington, author of We’ll Always Have Paris.

Emma Beddington’s memoir, We’ll Always Have Paris, published earlier this month, is a memoir of a life spent, as the book’s subtitle says, trying and failing to be French. An early encounter with a library copy of French Elle promised glamorous, intellectual delights not otherwise available to a North Yorkshire teenager and prompted an enduring francophilia, leading, inevitably, to a move to Paris. At its heart, We’ll Always Have Paris is a journey of self-discovery: if, try as you might, you can’t be French, how do you find out who you really are, and what you really want to be?

Emma is also the author of the  immensely successful blog, Belgian Waffling, and a contributor to The Telegraph, The Guardian, Red and ELLE. I sat down with her to ask her about writing her book.

H: How are you feeling now that We’ll Always Have Paris has been properly released into the wild?

E: I feel terrified and excited and like I want to run away to a remote cave, which I think must be pretty standard, especially with memoir. I have started getting texts from friends as they read through it which is very odd – good odd, but odd.

H: What kinds of things are people saying?

E: My friend Frances who is also married to a Frenchman was laughing about me saying my husband’s Proustian madeleine was tinned ravioli and saying her husband’s was coquilettes pasta (little shells) and knacki sausages which are these gross things you get in french hypermarkets that are made out of hooves and lips. Someone else was texting about early crushes – mine : Gary Speed, the man from the electricians and France, hers: the drummer from curiosity killed the cat.

H: One of the many joys of the book is the contrast between our expectations of what ‘being french’ means and the harsh reality – we think it’s all the glamour of À bout de souffle and how neatly tying a little scarf will turn you into Juliette Greco but it’s actually tinned ravioli and knacki sausages

E: I moved to provincial France in 1994 and it was NOTHING like nouvelle vague cinema. I remember watching French sitcoms (also terrible) and being mesmerised by the terrible clothes; boxy jackets with big shoulder pads, ill-advised vest tops

H: Your lovely book is subtitled Trying and Failing to be French – are you still an incorrigible francophile, or has French Elle no longer any allure?

E: I’m a ‘francophile avertie’ now – I know my own folly. I still can’t resist it, but I know it’s not the answer, really, not for me. Also, provincial France – that British Provence/Normandy/Côte d’Azur dream – holds no appeal to me. It’s Paris and nothing but. I want to be in St Germain or the Marais with a nicely groomed dog and an amazing wardrobe. Yes STILL, like I did when I was 16. Sigh, there is no hope.  Continue reading